Main.CRANDIC History

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As of September 2010, the section between Fairfax and Yocum Connection became Iowa Interstate Subdivision 3B, with warrants issued by IAIS dispatch.

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(:menulocation Railfan Guide:CRANDIC:)

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(:menulocation Operations:CRANDIC:)

Added lines 21-51:
Mile
Post
Station Sidings Other
Tracks
Notes
W
E
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B
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8.1  Fairfax
 
E
A
S
T
B
O
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North end of IAIS Sub 3B
8.1  Fairfax North end of IAIS Sub 3B
17.1  East Amana MP approximate - not on CIC timetable
17.1  East Amana MP approximate - not on CIC timetable
21.8  Yocum Connection Junction with IAIS Subdivision 3
Became IAIS Sub 3B Sep 2010
21.8  Yocum Connection Junction with IAIS Subdivision 3
Became IAIS Sub 3B Sep 2010
8.1  Fairfax
8.1  Fairfax North end of IAIS Sub 3B
21.8  Yocum Connection Junction with IAIS Subdivision 3
21.8  Yocum Connection Junction with IAIS Subdivision 3
Became IAIS Sub 3B Sep 2010
0.0  Cedar Rapids, IA
0.5  UP Interchange
2.1  Pinney YesEngleside Wye - Connection between CIC First and Third Subs
2.6  Waconia
5.5  Konigsmark
8.5  Swisher
13.5  Mid River
16.9  North Liberty
19.9  Oakdale
23.2  Coralville
25.0  University
25.5  Iowa City, IA YesConnection to IAIS yard and CIC Second Sub
CEDAR RAPIDS AND IOWA CITY RAILROAD - THIRD SUB
CEDAR RAPIDS, IA, TO YOCUM CONNECTION, IA
Maximum Speed: Unknown Length: 21.8 miles
Entire line Track Warrant Control
Radio: CIC - 161.055 MHz and 160.500 MHz
Mile
Post
Station Sidings Other
Tracks
Notes
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0.0  Cedar Rapids, IA
 
E
A
S
T
B
O
U
N
D
0.5  UP Interchange
2.1  Pinney YesEngleside Wye - Connection between CIC First and Third Subs
4.5  Smith-Dows Yard YesYard serves as IAIS/CIC interchange point
8.1  Fairfax
11.6  Walford
17.1  East Amana MP approximate - not on CIC timetable
18.4  Amana
19.7  Amana Refrigeration
21.8  Yocum Connection Junction with IAIS Subdivision 3
Changed line 5 from:

Note: The Cedar Rapids & Iowa City's official AAR reporting mark are CRIC. However, to avoid confusion with the Iowa Interstate symbol CRIC (Cedar Rapids to Iowa City), this site will usually refer to the railroad as either the Crandic, or the CIC.

to:

Note: The Cedar Rapids & Iowa City's official AAR reporting mark are CRIC. However, to avoid confusion with the Iowa Interstate symbol CRIC (Cedar Rapids to Iowa City), this site will usually refer to the railroad as either the Crandic, or the CIC.

Changed line 5 from:

'''Note: The Cedar Rapids & Iowa City's official AAR reporting mark are CRIC. However, to avoid confusion with the Iowa Interstate symbol CRIC (Cedar Rapids to Iowa City), this site will usually refer to the railroad as either the Crandic, or the CIC.

to:

Note: The Cedar Rapids & Iowa City's official AAR reporting mark are CRIC. However, to avoid confusion with the Iowa Interstate symbol CRIC (Cedar Rapids to Iowa City), this site will usually refer to the railroad as either the Crandic, or the CIC.

Added lines 5-6:

'''Note: The Cedar Rapids & Iowa City's official AAR reporting mark are CRIC. However, to avoid confusion with the Iowa Interstate symbol CRIC (Cedar Rapids to Iowa City), this site will usually refer to the railroad as either the Crandic, or the CIC.

Changed lines 13-20 from:

In addition to the daily ICCR/CRIC turn, there are also coal trains and unit grain trains that ply the line off IAIS. The coal trains originate on the Canadian National, and are handed off to IAIS at Peoria on the IAIS's Second Sub. These then make their way over the IAIS First and IAIS Third Subs, head up the CIC's Third Sub, unload, and head back to the Peoria gateway. Often, the run back from Cedar Rapids is handled combined with the day's CRIC job, leading to a monsterous train and an incredible amount of power on the front (the coal train power is combined with the ICCR power for the run). The grain trains come in from the west of Yocum (Newton, typically), and are sometimes handed off to the ICCR at the Yocum wye. The CIC's Third Sub is a vital and active part of today's IAIS that's easy to railfan in the daylight, unlike many other parts of the system that operate primarily at night.

to:

In addition to the daily ICCR/CRIC turn, there are also coal trains and unit grain trains that ply the line off IAIS. The coal trains originate on the Canadian National, and are handed off to IAIS at Peoria on the IAIS's Second Sub. These then make their way over the IAIS First and IAIS Third Subs, head up the CIC's Third Sub, unload, and head back to the Peoria gateway. Often, the run back from Cedar Rapids is handled combined with the day's CRIC job, leading to a monsterous train and an incredible amount of power on the front (the coal train power is combined with the ICCR power for the run). The grain trains come in from the west of Yocum (Newton, typically), and are sometimes handed off to the ICCR at the Yocum wye. The CIC's Third Sub is a vital and active part of today's IAIS that's easy to railfan in the daylight, unlike many other parts of the system that operate primarily at night.

CRANDIC Timetables
Changed lines 7-11 from:

For years, the First Sub handled the majority of the traffic, interchanging rather large amounts of freight with Iowa Interstate in Iowa City via what's known as the Hill Track. This is a steep piece of trackage that extends out of the west end of IAIS's yard and is about as close to street running as you can get without being in the street as it winds down to the CIC connection. In poor condition, running through a residential neighborhood, and with numerous opportunities for grade crossing collisions, something better was found in 2000. On 11-Feb-2000, Yocum Connection - a full wye interchange between the IAIS Third Sub and CIC Third Sub at Homestead, IA - was placed into service, and would become the new primary interchange point for the two railroads.

In Aug 2004, it changed again, from an important interchange point to a fundamental part of IAIS operations on the IAIS Third Sub. As part of an experimental six month trial expected to become permanent, the CRANDIC no longer operates the through freights on this line. Rather, daily interchange with the IAIS is accomplished at Smith-Dows yard, with IAIS running the ICCR / CRIC (Iowa City-Cedar Rapids and reverse) turn out of Iowa City every morning. This train is typically made up between 1000h and 1200h at Iowa City and then works up to Smith-Dows. It switches out the freight, and sometime in the late afternoon returns to Iowa City. It makes for a very regular, easy to follow daylight train. This train is also the reason the IAIS acquired the four leased LLPX SD38-2s. The line from East Amana to Walford is quite steep against northbounds, and the ICCR trains typically run very heavy (100 cars is not atypical).

In addition to the daily ICCR/CRIC turn, there are also coal trains and unit grain trains that ply the line off IAIS. The coal trains originate on the Canadian National, and are handed off to IAIS at Peoria on the IAIS's Second Sub. These then make their way over the IAIS First and IAIS Third Subs, head up the CIC's Third Sub, unload, and head back to the Peoria gateway. Often, the run back from Cedar Rapids is handled combined with the day's CRIC job, leading to a monsterous train and an incredible amount of power on the front (the coal train power is combined with the ICCR power for the run). The grain trains come in from the west of Yocum (Newton, typically), and are sometimes handed off to the ICCR at the Yocum wye. The CIC's Third Sub is a vital and active part of today's IAIS that's easy to railfan in the daylight, unlike many other parts of the system that operate primarily at night.

to:

For years, the First Sub handled the majority of the traffic, interchanging rather large amounts of freight with Iowa Interstate in Iowa City via what's known as the Hill Track. This is a steep piece of trackage that extends out of the west end of IAIS's yard and is about as close to street running as you can get without being in the street as it winds down to the CIC connection. In poor condition, running through a residential neighborhood, and with numerous opportunities for grade crossing collisions, something better was found in 2000. On 11-Feb-2000, Yocum Connection - a full wye interchange between the IAIS Third Sub and CIC Third Sub at Homestead, IA - was placed into service, and would become the new primary interchange point for the two railroads.

In Aug 2004, it changed again, from an important interchange point to a fundamental part of IAIS operations on the IAIS Third Sub. As part of an experimental six month trial expected to become permanent, the CRANDIC no longer operates the through freights on this line. Rather, daily interchange with the IAIS is accomplished at Smith-Dows yard, with IAIS running the ICCR / CRIC (Iowa City-Cedar Rapids and reverse) turn out of Iowa City every morning. This train is typically made up between 1000h and 1200h at Iowa City and then works up to Smith-Dows. It switches out the freight, and sometime in the late afternoon returns to Iowa City. It makes for a very regular, easy to follow daylight train. This train is also the reason the IAIS acquired the four leased LLPX SD38-2s. The line from East Amana to Walford is quite steep against northbounds, and the ICCR trains typically run very heavy (100 cars is not atypical).

In addition to the daily ICCR/CRIC turn, there are also coal trains and unit grain trains that ply the line off IAIS. The coal trains originate on the Canadian National, and are handed off to IAIS at Peoria on the IAIS's Second Sub. These then make their way over the IAIS First and IAIS Third Subs, head up the CIC's Third Sub, unload, and head back to the Peoria gateway. Often, the run back from Cedar Rapids is handled combined with the day's CRIC job, leading to a monsterous train and an incredible amount of power on the front (the coal train power is combined with the ICCR power for the run). The grain trains come in from the west of Yocum (Newton, typically), and are sometimes handed off to the ICCR at the Yocum wye. The CIC's Third Sub is a vital and active part of today's IAIS that's easy to railfan in the daylight, unlike many other parts of the system that operate primarily at night.

Changed line 5 from:

Not officially part of the Iowa Interstate system, the Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway (CRANDIC or CIC) has always been an important part of the Iowa Interstate story, and so is included here. Founded in 1904 as an electric interurban railway between its namesake cities, the line lives on today as a wholly-owned subsidiary of its parent utility company, Alliant Energy. Stopping regular electric passenger service in 1953, the line dieselized and continued to provide freight service along its original route, now known as the CIC First Subdivision and roughly paralleling I-380. In 1981, it picked up the former Milwaukee Road line between Cedar Rapids and Homestead, IA, which became known as the Third Subdivision. The line originally extended between Cedar Rapids, IA, and Ottumwa, IA, where it joined the line between Davenport and Kansas City, but today the CRANDIC's portion is all that remains. Somewhere along the way they also picked up the former Rock Island 7 mile branchline between Iowa City and Hills, IA, which is today the CIC Second Sub.

to:
Not officially part of the Iowa Interstate system, the Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway (CRANDIC or CIC) has always been an important part of the Iowa Interstate story, and so is included here. Founded in 1904 as an electric interurban railway between its namesake cities, the line lives on today as a wholly-owned subsidiary of its parent utility company, Alliant Energy. Stopping regular electric passenger service in 1953, the line dieselized and continued to provide freight service along its original route, now known as the CIC First Subdivision and roughly paralleling I-380. In 1981, it picked up the former Milwaukee Road line between Cedar Rapids and Homestead, IA, which became known as the Third Subdivision. The line originally extended between Cedar Rapids, IA, and Ottumwa, IA, where it joined the line between Davenport and Kansas City, but today the CRANDIC's portion is all that remains. Somewhere along the way they also picked up the former Rock Island 7 mile branchline between Iowa City and Hills, IA, which is today the CIC Second Sub.
Added lines 1-11:

(:notitle:) (:menulocation Railfan Guide:CRANDIC:)

Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway

Not officially part of the Iowa Interstate system, the Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway (CRANDIC or CIC) has always been an important part of the Iowa Interstate story, and so is included here. Founded in 1904 as an electric interurban railway between its namesake cities, the line lives on today as a wholly-owned subsidiary of its parent utility company, Alliant Energy. Stopping regular electric passenger service in 1953, the line dieselized and continued to provide freight service along its original route, now known as the CIC First Subdivision and roughly paralleling I-380. In 1981, it picked up the former Milwaukee Road line between Cedar Rapids and Homestead, IA, which became known as the Third Subdivision. The line originally extended between Cedar Rapids, IA, and Ottumwa, IA, where it joined the line between Davenport and Kansas City, but today the CRANDIC's portion is all that remains. Somewhere along the way they also picked up the former Rock Island 7 mile branchline between Iowa City and Hills, IA, which is today the CIC Second Sub.

For years, the First Sub handled the majority of the traffic, interchanging rather large amounts of freight with Iowa Interstate in Iowa City via what's known as the Hill Track. This is a steep piece of trackage that extends out of the west end of IAIS's yard and is about as close to street running as you can get without being in the street as it winds down to the CIC connection. In poor condition, running through a residential neighborhood, and with numerous opportunities for grade crossing collisions, something better was found in 2000. On 11-Feb-2000, Yocum Connection - a full wye interchange between the IAIS Third Sub and CIC Third Sub at Homestead, IA - was placed into service, and would become the new primary interchange point for the two railroads.

In Aug 2004, it changed again, from an important interchange point to a fundamental part of IAIS operations on the IAIS Third Sub. As part of an experimental six month trial expected to become permanent, the CRANDIC no longer operates the through freights on this line. Rather, daily interchange with the IAIS is accomplished at Smith-Dows yard, with IAIS running the ICCR / CRIC (Iowa City-Cedar Rapids and reverse) turn out of Iowa City every morning. This train is typically made up between 1000h and 1200h at Iowa City and then works up to Smith-Dows. It switches out the freight, and sometime in the late afternoon returns to Iowa City. It makes for a very regular, easy to follow daylight train. This train is also the reason the IAIS acquired the four leased LLPX SD38-2s. The line from East Amana to Walford is quite steep against northbounds, and the ICCR trains typically run very heavy (100 cars is not atypical).

In addition to the daily ICCR/CRIC turn, there are also coal trains and unit grain trains that ply the line off IAIS. The coal trains originate on the Canadian National, and are handed off to IAIS at Peoria on the IAIS's Second Sub. These then make their way over the IAIS First and IAIS Third Subs, head up the CIC's Third Sub, unload, and head back to the Peoria gateway. Often, the run back from Cedar Rapids is handled combined with the day's CRIC job, leading to a monsterous train and an incredible amount of power on the front (the coal train power is combined with the ICCR power for the run). The grain trains come in from the west of Yocum (Newton, typically), and are sometimes handed off to the ICCR at the Yocum wye. The CIC's Third Sub is a vital and active part of today's IAIS that's easy to railfan in the daylight, unlike many other parts of the system that operate primarily at night.

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  Last modified on December 21, 2010, at 09:14 PM
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